(800) 792-8735

Who is the Most at Risk for Elder Abuse?

If you are considering looking into options to ensure your senior loved one receives care while you are at work or away, you probably don’t think much about the possibility of elder abuse. Unfortunately, this is something that is going on all across the country. Even though elder abuse is complex, it doesn’t mean there aren’t signs you can look for to know if your loved one is at a higher risk for being abused. 

Getting to know some of the most common risk factors of elder abuse is the best way to ensure it doesn’t occur. If you believe your loved one has been abused or neglected, the best thing you can do is hire an attorney. Keep reading to learn some of the risk factors of abuse and neglect that may make your loved one more likely to be a victim. 

Risk Factors That Make Elder Abuse More Likely 

There are several risk factors that are often listed as contributing to senior abuse or neglect. These are found here. 

The Wrong or Untrained Caregiver/Facility 

The bad news is, not all caregivers nor nursing home workers are meant for this profession. If the individuals who are providing care for your loved one are not properly trained and screened, abuse is more likely. It’s best to use a quality caregiving service or facility to avoid this situation. 

Being a Woman 

The sad truth is that women are much more likely to be targeted by an abuser in the senior care environment. What’s even worse is that it is estimated that only one out of 14 of all senior abuse cases are ever reported to the authorities. 

Individuals Over the Age of 80

When someone is advanced in age, their health and abilities tend to decline. This may make that person more susceptible to abuse. 

Language Barriers 

Because of a person’s inability to speak or communicate, someone with language barriers has a higher likelihood of being a victim of abuse. That’s because they are unable to let others know what is going on. 

Isolation 

Along with other abuse crimes, people who abuse seniors will often choose victims who are isolated or who have limited interactions with people from the outside world. Make sure there is a strong support system in place when seeking outside care for a loved one to minimize the likelihood that abuse will occur. 

What to Do if You Suspect Abuse 

If you believe that your senior loved one has been a victim of abuse, it’s essential that you take action. In addition to reporting this to the professionals, it is also a good idea to seek legal counsel. 

Nursing home and elderly abuse is an all-too-common occurrence across the country and something that family members of elderly individuals must report to ensure it is stopped. Keep the information here in mind to know some of the risk factors that may result in your loved one being a victim.